Discover the Charms of Dublin’s Surroundings

Culture, landscapes, people and experiences. The junction of these four elements are what make traveling so incredible.

 

Ireland’s beaches may not be the hottest, but nature and tradition captivate tourists all year round. There are fantastic places to discover that reserve surprises for those who like to relax, hike, or play sports and the best part is that they are easily accessible and within easy reach from Dublin.

Wicklow

A few miles separate Dublin from Wicklow, one of Ireland’s most beautiful counties, bringing together all that is best in natural beauty such as beaches, mountains, lakes, waterfalls, and stunning scenery.

Enjoy a walk through the Wicklow Mountains through Glendalough and also visit Powerscourt House & Gardens which is considered to be one of the most beautiful Irish gardens.

The beautiful Guinness Lake in Wicklow

The lake has small beaches of white sand bathed by waters of dark colour, which remind us of the drink. But if the lake is not made of Guinness, at least it is worth knowing that all the water used in the production of this beer and which is pointed out as one of its quality secrets due to purity, comes from the Wicklow mountains.

Newgrange

Newgrange is one of Ireland’s most popular tour attractions. Older than the pyramids of Egypt, it is estimated that the tomb of Newgrange is more than 5,000 years old.

The monument is considered World Heritage by UNESCO and was built in a specific way so that on the shortest day of the year, December 21, the sun’s rays enter the skylight of the tomb and reach the main chamber, illuminating it completely for some minutes. This event is called Winter Solstice and draws annually countless visitors who try to witness this event.

Newgrange is located in County Meath, less than two hours from Dublin.

Trim Castle

Who remembers the movie Braveheart with Mel Gibson? Part of it was filmed on this Irish postcard, which is located in the homonymous town in County Meath.

Built in 1173, Trim Castle is the largest Anglo-Norman castle in the country and is located just over 40 minutes from Dublin city centre by car.

Dun Laoghaire and Killiney Hill

Killiney lies to the south of the Irish capital and belongs to the county of Dun Laoghaire.

The stunning view from the top of Killiney Hill Park on a beautiful sunny day leaves no doubt that this is one of the most beautiful beaches in the entire Emerald Isle.

The stretch between Ballybrack and Killiney Hill Park is about 3 km long and features an obelisk at the top of the hill (170 meters above the sea). The view is one of the best, and you can see the south coast of Dublin, Bray, and the mountains of Wicklow.

Well worth a visit for those who want to get to know a bit more of Dun Laoghaire.

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